Tell Them We Are Rising - PBS 2017

Freelance Cinematographer

Titled “Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” the PBS documentary (and multimedia project) will dig into the significance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in American history, culture, and national identity, via the many stories from HBCU students, faculty, staff, and alumni. The documentary will tell stories of Americans who would not be denied a higher education, demonstrating how the 150-year history of HBCUs have influenced generations of Americans and shaped the landscape of the country. 

Screened at Sundance Film Festival 2017

 

Pops - ITVS Digital & PBS 2017

Creator & Director/Producer

POPS addresses the reality and challenges of 21st Century parenthood for African American fathers.  The societal narrative of the deadbeat black father is generally accepted as a fact of life for African American children.   Buried beneath these assumptions are the facts of black fatherhood that dispel some of those stereotypes.  The web series follows the parenting experiences of Shaka Senghor, LaGuardia Cross, and the Stroman-Iniss family during the course of a year.  Each father’s is facing the toughest challenge of their life - becoming good fathers.  Pops is a web series funded by National Black Programming Consortium and ITVS Digital. 

Winner of ITVS Digital Open Call funding

 

Pare Lorentz Fund Panel - International Documentary Association 2015

Panelist

I was responsible for reviewing 20 documentary projects on the final selection panel for IDA's 2015 Pare Lorentz Documentary Fund.  The Pare Lorentz Documentary Fund supports full-length documentary films that reflect the spirit and nature of Pare Lorentz's work, exhibiting objective research, artful storytelling, strong visual style, high production values, artistic writing, and outstanding music composition, as well as skillful direction, camerawork and editing.

 

NBPC 360 Incubator - PBS 2015

NBPC 360 Incubator Fellow

NBPC 360 is the new funding initiative of the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC) devised to help launch non-fiction and fiction serial projects, as well as interactive or “trans-media” projects, about the Black experience.  The NBPC 360 fund and incubator featured training designed to support filmmakers’ ability to pitch and present public media projects.   Fellows worked on project pilots and budgets to pitch projects in front of industry professionals at WNYC during April of 2015.

Winner of NBPC 360 Incubator funding

 

180 Days: Hartsville - PBS 2015                        

Co-Producer/Director/Cinematographer

Two part documentary series, aired nationally on PBS March 2015, the series highlights two elementary schools in Hartsville, SC and local community efforts in trying to create positive changes in education.  In 180 Days: Hartsville, viewers will experience a year in the life of one Southern town’s efforts to address the urgent demand for reform in American public schools, and watch what happens when the systems that can either fuel or diffuse that reform – bureaucracy, economic opportunity, and fixed mindsets – interact and intersect.

 

Time.com Tony Fadell/NEST Thermostat Profile - 2014

Freelance Producer/Shooter

A five minute profile on Tony Fadell on of TIMES’s 100 most influential people and the NEST thermostat.  Tony is a Lebanese-American inventor, designer, entrepreneur, and angel investor.  He served as the Senior Vice President of the iPod Division at Apple Inc., from March 2006 to November 2008 and is known as "one of the fathers of the iPod", for his work on the first generations of Apple's music player.  In May 2010, he founded Nest Labs, which announced its first product, the Nest Learning Thermostat, in October 2011. 

 

Coming Back - PBS 2013                            

Series Co-Cinematographer

Coming Back with Wes Moore, is a series produced by best-selling author and Army combat veteran Wes Moore, aired in three parts. The three episode series tells the story of Wes Moore’s search for answers to some of the most difficult questions related to returning from war.  Moore’s journey takes him into the personal lives of soldiers as they attempt to reintegrate back into society, establish new identities, and – for many – find a new mission. 

 

The New Black - PBS 2013                         

Co-Cinematographer

The New Black is a nationally broadcasted PBS documentary that tells the story of select African-American communities grappling with the recent gay marriage movement and the fight for civil rights.   The film documents activists, families and clergy on both sides of the campaign to legalize gay marriage and examines homophobia in the black community’s institutional pillar—the black church and reveals the Christian right wing’s strategy of exploiting this phenomenon in order to pursue an anti-gay political agenda.

Winner of AFI Silver Docs Audience Award

Nominated for NACCP Image Award

HBO/BET Urban World Film Festival Best Doc Feature

 

180 Days: Life Inside an American High School - PBS 2013    

Co-Producer/Director/Cinematographer

A two part documentary series that aired on PBS in 2013, the project centers on a tumultuous high school year in Washington DC.  Following the day-to-day stories of students, parents, teachers and staff at the Washington Metropolitan High School (DC MET), “180 Days: Inside An American High School” is an intimate portrait of a public school that attempts to make a difference in the lives of students each and every day.  Whether they are preparing for college or becoming teen moms, the students at DC Met face many challenges with spirit and resilience and welcome us to challenge many of our own assumptions as we travel with the first graduating class to commencement.  Led by a charismatic and outspoken young principal, DC Met invites us in for an unprecedented first-hand account of life inside of the school reform movement.

Winner of 2013 Peabody Award

Nominated: International Documentary Association Award

 

Black In America 4: The New Promised Land - CNN 2012           

Field Producer/Shooter

Eight tech entrepreneurs live in a San Francisco house, determined to pitch web applications to technology companies in Silicon Valley.  CNN anchor and special correspondent Soledad O’Brien reports that the ownership of this digital bloom is mostly young, white, and male.  For her fourth Black in America documentary, O’Brien asks why, according to industry analyst CB Insights, less than one percent of all venture capital money went to digital startups with African-American founders in 2010 – and she profiles a unique, technology-focused “accelerator” developed to help African-American digital entrepreneurs secure funding to establish their businesses.

 

Homecoming: The Killing Of DJ Henry - BET 2011              

Producer/Shooter

A one-hour documentary on Danroy "DJ" Henry Jr., a 20-year-old Pace University football player shot dead by police outside a New York State bar.  BET’s Weekly With Ed Gordon lookds at the casethrough firsthand accounts of his parents, Danroy and Angela Henry; key eyewitness and shooting survivor Brandon Cox and his parents; and Harvard Law professor and attorney Charles Ogletree, who represents the Cox family.

2012 NAMIC (Multi-ethnicity in Communications) Vision Award Nominee

 

Heart Of The City: New Orleans - BET 2010             

Field Producer/Shooter

Five years after the United States' most devastating natural disaster, Hurricane Katrina, BET News returned to New Orleans for an exclusive prime time special, HEART OF THE CITY: KATRINA FIVE YEARS LATER, hosted by actress and activist, Jurnee Smollett.   For the past year, BET News followed the stories of several men and women living in the Ninth Ward, the community in New Orleans most devastated by the hurricane and levee breach.  With emotions running high, residents take viewers inside their lives by detailing their challenges and outlining their hopes for the future.  This hour long special raised the question: will the BP oil spill make it harder for the people of the Ninth Ward to recover from Katrina? Or will the disaster put fresh attention on an area in distress?

 

Haiti: One Day, One Destiny - PBS 2010

Cinematographer

Haiti: One Day, One Destiny is an online multi-media portal of short stories and a broadcast documentary about Haiti six-weeks after the disastrous earthquake of 2010.  National Black Programming Consortium commissioned the project to capture the day-to-day struggle of recovery and Haitian reflections on the tragedy.  The project aired as a one hour television documentary on PBS World Channel.