In Planetary Panorama, photographer Vincent Brady used a self-made four-camera rig to take an incredibly beautiful 360-degree look at the night sky. Each camera was equipped with a fish-eye lens and did nonstop long exposures for the three or so hours the camera’s battery typically lasts. This gave Brady thousands of panorama images, which he then stitched together into a single time-lapse video. The result is an incredible, almost breathtaking modern-day version of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”

cnet.co/1kg0Wbg

Source: youtube.com

Screenwriting Analysis That Can Help You Improve Your Screenplay by Michael Hauge & Mark W. Travis

Source: youtube.com

What A Director Should Say To An Actor After Saying Cut by Mark W. Travis & Michael Hauge

Source: youtube.com

How A Talented Actor Can Be A Problem For A Director by Mark W. Travis & Michael Hauge

Source: youtube.com

humansofnewyork:

"I tell them: ‘Don’t think about money. Let Grandpa think about money. Just think about your education.’"

humansofnewyork:

"I tell them: ‘Don’t think about money. Let Grandpa think about money. Just think about your education.’"

theparisreview:

“Pascal once remarked, ‘If Cleopatra’s nose had been out of joint the history of the world would have changed.’ And so it is with the whistles of referees and the history of World Cups.”
Jonathan Wilson on Brazil in the World Cup.

theparisreview:

“Pascal once remarked, ‘If Cleopatra’s nose had been out of joint the history of the world would have changed.’ And so it is with the whistles of referees and the history of World Cups.”

Jonathan Wilson on Brazil in the World Cup.

dynamicafrica:

Soccer Dads: Top Footballers of African-descent From Africa and the Diaspora.

  • Pelé and family. (Afro-Brazilian)
  • Zinedine Zidane and son. (Kabyle)
  • Cristiano Ronaldo. (Cape Verdean great-grandmother)
  • Didier Drogba. (Ivory Coast)
  • Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima. (Afro-Brazilian)
  • Samuel Eto’o and his children. (Cameroon)
  • Kwadwo Asamoah with his wife and son. (Ghana)
  • George Weah and his children. (Liberia)
  • Nwankwo Kanu and family. (Nigeria)
  • Jay-Jay Okocha and family. (Nigeria)
The war against euphemism and cliché matters not because we can guarantee that eliminating them will help us speak nothing but the truth but, rather, because eliminating them from our language is an act of courage that helps us get just a little closer to the truth. Clear speech takes courage.

Adam Gopnik on Richard Martinez’s courage to speak the painful truth about guns: http://nyr.kr/1jPdeuc

(via newyorker)

Source: Slate

I did some work recently for a Time.com video project on Tony Fadell, one of TIME’s 100 most influential people.  I filmed an interview with world renown (architect) (William McDonough) on the (Nest Thermostat.)   

"Tony Fadell, designer of the first iPod, threw his hat into the ring of the smart-tech competition in 2010 with his company Nest. In 2011, Nest announced a high-tech remote controlled thermostat that is constantly learning about your energy use. Fadell’s company was recently bought by Google for 3.2 billion dollars.”  -Corey Protin, time.com

Check out more technology and environmental news from time.com VJ Corey Protin.  (click here)

Culture alone, high or low, does not point a path to better relations. But it’s important to acknowledge the convergence of our lived experience, if only as ballast against the rising tension between the U.S. and China. The men and women who would be most affected by a downturn in the world’s most important diplomatic relationship have more in common than they might imagine.
Evan Osnos on how popular shows like “The Big Bang Theory” are giving people on both sides of the Pacific more in common than ever before: http://nyr.kr/1tjY1V0 (via newyorker)
pulitzercenter:

Join us tonight for a conversation with Pulitzer Center grantees Ameto Akpe and Allison Shelley about their work reporting on women’s health in Nigeria. Shelley will share her work documenting access to family planning options for Nigerian women, and Akpe will present her coverage of foreign aid in Nigeria and its impact on the country’s women’s health initiatives.
Akpe, a Nigerian print journalist, was the 2013 Persephone Miel fellow and a Nieman fellow at Harvard University. In her Pulitzer Center-supported project, “Nigeria: U.S. Dollars and Dubious Results,” Akpe explores the impact of U.S. foreign aid in northern Nigeria, asking just how much this money has been able to change health outcomes in the region, and how these displays of American “soft power” will be affected by the rise of Boko Haram, an anti-Western, anti-Christian, and anti-democratic group.
Shelley is an independent documentary photographer and multimedia creator. In her project, “Deadly Cycle: Nigeria’s Silent Abortion Crisis,” along with journalist Allyn Gaestel, Shelley portrays the struggles for Nigerian women as they navigate the country’s reproductive health laws. Contraception is difficult to obtain and with limited access to family planning, one third of Nigerian women have experienced an unwanted pregnancy. Unfortunately, many of these women turn to abortion, which is illegal and dangerous.
We’ll start the evening with a light reception at 5:30 pm, followed by remarks at 6 pm.Reserve your seat today: rsvp@pulitzercenter.org—specify in subject line: “May 21 Talks @ Pulitzer.”
Wednesday, May 215:30-7pm
Pulitzer Center
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 615
Washington, DC 20036
Closest Metro: Dupont Circle
The event will be livestreamed using Google Hangout on Air. Watch above (refresh the page if you do not see a video) or on YouTube. Tweet your questions to @pulitzercenter.
This talk is the fourth in a special series of talks @ pulitzer on issues affecting women and children. The series kicked off in April 2014 with two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Larry C. Price and his work on child labor in the gold mining industry. Other events in the series will feature the work of Pulitzer Center journalists such as Mellissa Fung on the education of girls in Afghanistan, Katherine Zoepf on Saudi women entering the workforce, Steve Sapienza on sex workers in Cambodia who are battling stigma and HIV, and Amy Toensing on widows in India who are both unwanted and unprotected. Details to follow.
Image by Allison Shelley. Nigeria, 2014.

pulitzercenter:

Join us tonight for a conversation with Pulitzer Center grantees Ameto Akpe and Allison Shelley about their work reporting on women’s health in Nigeria. Shelley will share her work documenting access to family planning options for Nigerian women, and Akpe will present her coverage of foreign aid in Nigeria and its impact on the country’s women’s health initiatives.

Akpe, a Nigerian print journalist, was the 2013 Persephone Miel fellow and a Nieman fellow at Harvard University. In her Pulitzer Center-supported project, “Nigeria: U.S. Dollars and Dubious Results,” Akpe explores the impact of U.S. foreign aid in northern Nigeria, asking just how much this money has been able to change health outcomes in the region, and how these displays of American “soft power” will be affected by the rise of Boko Haram, an anti-Western, anti-Christian, and anti-democratic group.

Shelley is an independent documentary photographer and multimedia creator. In her project, “Deadly Cycle: Nigeria’s Silent Abortion Crisis,” along with journalist Allyn Gaestel, Shelley portrays the struggles for Nigerian women as they navigate the country’s reproductive health laws. Contraception is difficult to obtain and with limited access to family planning, one third of Nigerian women have experienced an unwanted pregnancy. Unfortunately, many of these women turn to abortion, which is illegal and dangerous.

We’ll start the evening with a light reception at 5:30 pm, followed by remarks at 6 pm.
Reserve your seat today: rsvp@pulitzercenter.org—specify in subject line: “May 21 Talks @ Pulitzer.”

Wednesday, May 21
5:30-7pm

Pulitzer Center

1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 615

Washington, DC 20036

Closest Metro: Dupont Circle

The event will be livestreamed using Google Hangout on Air. Watch above (refresh the page if you do not see a video) or on YouTube. Tweet your questions to @pulitzercenter.

This talk is the fourth in a special series of talks @ pulitzer on issues affecting women and children. The series kicked off in April 2014 with two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Larry C. Price and his work on child labor in the gold mining industry. Other events in the series will feature the work of Pulitzer Center journalists such as Mellissa Fung on the education of girls in Afghanistan, Katherine Zoepf on Saudi women entering the workforce, Steve Sapienza on sex workers in Cambodia who are battling stigma and HIV, and Amy Toensing on widows in India who are both unwanted and unprotected. Details to follow.

Image by Allison Shelley. Nigeria, 2014.

[There] are curtain rise and curtain fall, but the story goes on and nothing finishes.