• Me: I wanna do something
  • Anxiety:
  • Anxiety:
  • Anxiety:
  • Anxiety:
  • Anxiety:
  • Anxiety: No you dont
  • Me: But
  • Anxiety: No

afrosntattoos:

crispculture:

Converse Chuck Taylor ‘Rubber’ - Order Online at the Converse Store

Want

Source: crispculture

dumbesttweets:

No. No, it is not. 

dumbesttweets:

No. No, it is not. 

oldflorida:

Old Florida signs

huffingtonpost:

10 Gorgeous Quotes From Banned Books (IMAGES)

When banned books come to mind, it’s easy to imagine bonfires full of burning pages. Banned books would seem to be the stuff of darker days and drearier times — but banned books are not a thing of the past.

For more stunning photos and quotes from books go here. 

theracismrepellent:

redsuns-n-orangemoons:

susemoji:

stantler:

strongblackbrotha:

Put this on your blog. Our Queens are perfection.

no offense but im pretty sure the jews have them beat….. by a lot.

JEWS ARE NOT A RACE

the idiot who posted that nonsense has deleted their blog, but for anyone with doubts.
“Within each racial/ethnic group, women earned the majority of degrees at all levels in 2009–10. For example, among U.S. residents, Black females earned 68 percent of associate’s degrees, 66 percent of bachelor’s degrees, 71 percent of master’s degrees, and 65 percent of all doctor’s degrees awarded to Black students.”

as you can see black women earn the majority of degrees by proportion, making us the most educated group in america.
kiss our black asses. 
brought to you by the National Center for Education Statistics.

We fabulous ~Tae

theracismrepellent:

redsuns-n-orangemoons:

susemoji:

stantler:

strongblackbrotha:

Put this on your blog. Our Queens are perfection.

no offense but im pretty sure the jews have them beat….. by a lot.

JEWS ARE NOT A RACE

the idiot who posted that nonsense has deleted their blog, but for anyone with doubts.

Within each racial/ethnic group, women earned the majority of degrees at all levels in 2009–10. For example, among U.S. residents, Black females earned 68 percent of associate’s degrees, 66 percent of bachelor’s degrees, 71 percent of master’s degrees, and 65 percent of all doctor’s degrees awarded to Black students.”

as you can see black women earn the majority of degrees by proportion, making us the most educated group in america.

kiss our black asses. 

brought to you by the National Center for Education Statistics.

We fabulous

~Tae

Source: letstlkabtus

rottentomatoes:

If I hadn’t been very rich, I might have been a really great man.

Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)

Certified Fresh at 100%

The G.O.A.T…
wandrlust:

Stanley Kubrick filming A Clockwork Orange (1971)

The G.O.A.T…

wandrlust:

Stanley Kubrick filming A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Source: wandrlust

Source: heybitchesgg

cleophatrajones:

poeticallybrown:

owl-vortex:

10 things our kids will never understand…

limewire lmao I forgot that was a thing woww. my memory

recording songs off the radio was disastrous

Source: owl-vortex

mindblowingscience:

Fukushima radiation still poisoning insects

Eating food contaminated with radioactive particles may be more perilous than thought—at least for insects. Butterfly larvae fed even slightly tainted leaves collected near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station were more likely to suffer physical abnormalities and low survival rates than those fed uncontaminated foliage, a new study finds. The research suggests that the environment in the Fukushima region, particularly in areas off-limits to humans because of safety concerns, will remain dangerous for wildlife for some time.
The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station disaster released massive amounts of radiation, much of which drifted out to sea. Humans were evacuated to safety and their exposure to radiation was minimal. But local wildlife were exposed both externally to radiation in the environment and internally from contaminated food sources. Joji Otaki, a biologist at University of the Ryukyus in Nishihara, Japan, and his colleagues have been conducting field studies and lab experiments on how such radiation affected the pale grass blue butterfly (Zizeeria maha), a species found throughout most of Japan.
In a previous experiment, Otaki’s group fed butterfly larvae leaves of the creeping woodsorrel (Oxalis corniculata) with radiation in the thousands of becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) gathered near the power plant within a few months after the accident. (For comparison, the Japanese government set a limit of 100 Bq/kg for human consumption of rice, meat, and fish, and 50 Bq/kg for milk and infant formula.) Larvae that dined on the radiation-drenched leaves had low survival rates and high incidences of physical abnormalities such as unusually small forewings. These results corroborated field surveys by others that turned up fewer butterflies in contaminated areas than would normally be expected.
The new study shows that radiation can damage larvae even at much lower concentrations. Otaki and colleagues collected leaves 16 to 20 months after the accident, after short-lived radioactive contamination had decayed, but this time from locations ranging from 59 to 1760 kilometers from the power plant; contamination levels ranged from 161 to 0.2 Bq/kg. They found that as contamination increased, mortality rates and incidences of abnormalities increased. “These results suggest that low-dose ingestion of approximately 100 Bq/kg may be seriously toxic to certain organisms,” the team writes in a paper published today in BMC Evolutionary Biology.  
In another experiment, the researchers divided offspring of the butterflies into two groups, feeding larvae either the same contaminated leaves their parents had eaten or uncontaminated leaves. Larvae fed the contaminated leaves had even lower survival rates and more abnormalities than their parents, whereas those feeding on clean leaves largely reverted to near-normal in both mortality rates and frequency of abnormalities.
The findings from Otaki’s group are “groundbreaking,” says Timothy Mousseau, a biologist at the University of South Carolina, Columbia, who also studies the effects of radiation on wildlife near Fukushima and Chernobyl. He notes that there have been “almost no studies” on how ingestion of radiation-tainted foods affect wildlife. Still, Mousseau cautions that the results should not be directly extrapolated to humans. “I think butterflies as a group are likely to be much more sensitive than humans to radiocontaminants,” he says. He adds that Otaki’s findings suggest that insects that survive after eating contaminated leaves might evolve tolerance to the low levels of radiation likely to persist in the Fukushima region for decades.

mindblowingscience:

Fukushima radiation still poisoning insects

Eating food contaminated with radioactive particles may be more perilous than thought—at least for insects. Butterfly larvae fed even slightly tainted leaves collected near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station were more likely to suffer physical abnormalities and low survival rates than those fed uncontaminated foliage, a new study finds. The research suggests that the environment in the Fukushima region, particularly in areas off-limits to humans because of safety concerns, will remain dangerous for wildlife for some time.

The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station disaster released massive amounts of radiation, much of which drifted out to sea. Humans were evacuated to safety and their exposure to radiation was minimal. But local wildlife were exposed both externally to radiation in the environment and internally from contaminated food sources. Joji Otaki, a biologist at University of the Ryukyus in Nishihara, Japan, and his colleagues have been conducting field studies and lab experiments on how such radiation affected the pale grass blue butterfly (Zizeeria maha), a species found throughout most of Japan.

In a previous experiment, Otaki’s group fed butterfly larvae leaves of the creeping woodsorrel (Oxalis corniculata) with radiation in the thousands of becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) gathered near the power plant within a few months after the accident. (For comparison, the Japanese government set a limit of 100 Bq/kg for human consumption of rice, meat, and fish, and 50 Bq/kg for milk and infant formula.) Larvae that dined on the radiation-drenched leaves had low survival rates and high incidences of physical abnormalities such as unusually small forewings. These results corroborated field surveys by others that turned up fewer butterflies in contaminated areas than would normally be expected.

The new study shows that radiation can damage larvae even at much lower concentrations. Otaki and colleagues collected leaves 16 to 20 months after the accident, after short-lived radioactive contamination had decayed, but this time from locations ranging from 59 to 1760 kilometers from the power plant; contamination levels ranged from 161 to 0.2 Bq/kg. They found that as contamination increased, mortality rates and incidences of abnormalities increased. “These results suggest that low-dose ingestion of approximately 100 Bq/kg may be seriously toxic to certain organisms,” the team writes in a paper published today in BMC Evolutionary Biology.  

In another experiment, the researchers divided offspring of the butterflies into two groups, feeding larvae either the same contaminated leaves their parents had eaten or uncontaminated leaves. Larvae fed the contaminated leaves had even lower survival rates and more abnormalities than their parents, whereas those feeding on clean leaves largely reverted to near-normal in both mortality rates and frequency of abnormalities.

The findings from Otaki’s group are “groundbreaking,” says Timothy Mousseau, a biologist at the University of South Carolina, Columbia, who also studies the effects of radiation on wildlife near Fukushima and Chernobyl. He notes that there have been “almost no studies” on how ingestion of radiation-tainted foods affect wildlife. Still, Mousseau cautions that the results should not be directly extrapolated to humans. “I think butterflies as a group are likely to be much more sensitive than humans to radiocontaminants,” he says. He adds that Otaki’s findings suggest that insects that survive after eating contaminated leaves might evolve tolerance to the low levels of radiation likely to persist in the Fukushima region for decades.

losangeleslovesyou:

MATHAS : STONE COLD SOBER (FEAT. EMPTY)